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Tell Me Everything: Why Your LinkedIn Profile Should Be Complete

linkedin-logoWhile I impress the need to be safe and to be selective in what to share, there are some times when a complete profile and sharing is imperative. Such is the case with LinkedIn. I myself have been using LinkedIn for a while now, but watching the professional networking site evolve into a more social experience, I have set aside more time to not only interact with its members but also take advantage of its options and benefits.

And if you haven’t, one advantage you should be taking advantage of is LinkedIn’s impressive mobile app, a terrific extension to what you can accomplish with LinkedIn working completely for you.

Herein lies the secret of LinkedIn — making it work completely for you. Even though LinkedIn is free, there is still an investment of time. When I found myself aggressively applying LinkedIn in 2012 for a job hunt, I knew I needed to give my online resume a complete update and overhaul, something I hadn’t done since 2009. I spent close to three days in re-writing summaries, collecting locations and titles, and updating employment history. That was when I notice a new feature: the “Profile Completeness” progress bar, located in the upper-right corner of my profile. I was only at 70%. I (can still) remember in college spending a solid week on my print resume, so another day or two to work on that 30% would not be so bad.

I hit the “100% completion” mark by the end of the day.

While I did feel a sense of accomplishment, I wondered why LinkedIn was suddenly focused on Profile Completeness? Wasn’t my degree and work experience enough? On a basic level, yes, but the basics alone isn’t what LinkedIn is all about. LinkedIn is a rare opportunity for candidates to get their name and experience in front of a physical person, and that can be a real challenge as resumes face a cyber-gauntlet designed to weed out candidates based on keywords. LinkedIn has evolved into the online initial screening and this is why a completed profile is important:

  • Completing a profile shows that you can finish a task. Think about it: you’re applying for a job and yet you didn’t feel the need to complete your profile, a trait that is visible when potential recruiters click the “View Full Profile” option.
  • Completing your profile showcases your writing skills. A skill essential to success in the corporate arena is strong writing. Your profile’s “Summary” is a first impression through writing, as well as a chance to pepper your profile with keywords that can improve your profile’s chances of being earmarked for consideration.
  • A complete profile goes more into the person behind the portfolio. While the basic one (or in those rare cases, two) page resumes give the details of you on the job, the complete LinkedIn profile offers you the ability to share published bylines, recommendations of peers and superiors from specific jobs, and honors and distinctions earned in the workplace.

Go on and invest some time in your LinkedIn profile. Set out to create a complete digital first impression that will keep you in front of potential clientele and employers. LinkedIn — when done right — can be your most powerful and impressive platform on which to build upon it a successful career.

Keeping Things Simple when Planning

keep_it_simpleI am a busy guy. I’m a writer, a public speaker, a social media professional, and I’m a husband and father. Not necessarily in that order, mind you. Busy, busy, busy. On looking at my life in this nutshell, you have to wonder how I keep everything straight.

Rule out “day planner” as one of your options because, well, I have opinions about them.

It was in the early 2000’s when I purchased for myself this goal-tracking, life-prioritizing, project-planning, super-duper, all-encompassing, kill-a-velociraptor-sized organizer. (Serious investors in this day planner kit could get it in a leather-bound binder, but I opted out for the beginner’s level vinyl…although I did plan to level up in the future.) It had pre-formatted pages for specific tasks, elegant tabs that could be color coded, and even a set of strategies and instructions on getting the most out of it. I sat down one Saturday afternoon, with the kit’s instructions in front of me, and started planning out projects, prerogatives, and To Do lists.

When I was done mapping out the present day and upcoming week, I looked up at the clock. The sun had set. It was late. I had to go to bed.

“Well, that must have just been for the initial set-up,” you may think, but no. Oh no. It was recommended by this day planner’s “program that I haul this goal-tracking, life-prioritizing, project-planning, super-duper, all-encompassing, kill-a-velociraptor-sized binder everywhere I went. You know, just in case I suddenly got an idea, or needed a weapon when the zombie apocalypse happens (and, essentially, achieve my ongoing “living to see another day” goal).

But that really wasn’t the problem. The real problem came whenever an idea came to mind. Unlike that heady euphoria I enjoyed on new ideas or possibilities, I would be overcome with a sense of dread as this meant consulting THE ALL-MIGHTY PLANNER to see if I could fit any of them into my schedule. No, I could not merely “glance” at this calendar. No, I had to consult it, find out if I could fit this inspiration into my already-meticulously schedule, costing me even more time.

Here’s my issue with planners — they can easily devolve into timesinks. We can spend so much time organizing goals, projects, and To Do’s into particular categories, timetables, and spreadsheets, that we lose time in working on accomplishing goals, projects, and To-Do’s.

So how can you keep it all straight? Look at the tools you have on hand and keeping it simple.

For myself, the goal-tracking, life-prioritizing, project-planning, super-duper, all-encompassing, kill-a-velociraptor-sized organizer has been replaced by my iPhone and iCloud. If an event or an idea comes up, I access iCal and tap in a few details. Automatically iCal syncs not only with other Apple devices, but also with apps that are granted permission to access iCal (such as LinkedIn’s mobile app). Events can be assigned multiple alerts for multiple times, and these alerts are received across my Apple devices. iCal also allows you to send out notifications to other people, notifying them in an email of the event and any changes concerning it. All this from an app that is free on your devices.

iCal is a great way to keep it simple. Once you have outgrown it, set your sights on something more robust such as Evernote, a popular planner and organizer for students and professionals. Organization is essential in successful projects and careers, but make certain to keep your goal setting and day planning to the basics. By taking it easy and keeping things elementary in the beginning, you give yourself room to grow.

You can also make sure you’re getting things done, which is the whole point of being organized to begin with.

5 Things to Do after You Lose a Job

walking_the_railsAnyone remember when job creation and unemployment were the priorities of the election? Anyone remember the doom and gloom people projected following our last election? Anyone remember this New York Times article from last month reporting that unemployment was at its lowest rate since 2009? How about these numbers from the Department of Labor backing up this article?

Me neither.

What I do remember is the irony that when I was hired in 2009 by Intersections, the Recession was in full swing with the Unemployment Rate clocking in at 9.6%. And at the beginning of 2012, where a variety of news outlets from around the world were all noticing an economic turnaround at the beginning of 2012 and the rate of 8.5%, I got downsized.

I’ve learned a lot since that time, the reality being that if a company or non-profit needs to get out of the red and into the black, layoffs will happen. Each layoff is different. Some employers treat you with respect and regret, and others don’t blink at blind-siding you and getting you out of the door. It’s hard to predict how bad news like this will come, but I can say there are five things to keep in mind when a rug is yanked out from under you.

1. Don’t panic. Flipping out is easy to do when this news hits; and it’s not going to help anyone. If it does anything, it’s going to make you look like a chump. When I was let go by Intersections, I took a deep breath, and thought, “Go out with class.” When all the formalities were done, I looked the EVP in the eye and said, “It’s been a good run. Thank you.”

Keep it together. Keep it classy.

2. DO. NOT. MELTDOWN. THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA. This was particularly tempting when, with another employer, I was let go under suspicious circumstances. Knowing what I knew about budgets, clerical errors, and executives denied what they really wanted, I knew this whole affair was unethical. When I got home, I felt an urge to go off completely, drop names, and face the fallout; but with my fingers over the keyboard, I paused.

I thought about it. Really thought about it.

What would have sharing my anger and ire accomplished? Social Media still has yet to shake its bad reputation for being all about the meltdowns, as if Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ are nothing more than the therapist’s couch online. Remember that when you go public on social networks, you are going public. How do you want to be remembered at your job and represented online?

Instead of the meltdown, I enjoyed a scotch and cigar on my patio, lit a fire in the firepit, and proceeded to Step 3.

3. Get organized. Whether it is the day of your release or the morning after, your priority should be to check, update, and review your LinkedIn page. Upgrading to a “Premium” account in order to get a few extra bells and whistles is a nice option, but not one I would deem a necessity. Another part of getting organized is to look over your accounts. Look up how much your spending, where you can make your dollar stretch, and what you will need to meet your financial obligations. Set up and maintain spreadsheets not only of your bills and money coming in and going out of your household, but also for the jobs you are applying. Track where you have sent your resume, what you’ve applied for, when, and from where you found the job opening. On your job tracking spreadsheet, you will also want to keep track of any responses so you have an idea of how well your resume is performing.

4. Keep it classy (and smart) when reaching out for references. At the time of downsizing, you have a window of opportunity — preferably within the first week of the layoff — in securing some terrific references. I reached out to the Intersections’ executives I dealt with directly and sent the following note:

I wanted to thank you for two-and-a-half terrific years with your company, Intersections. I’m looking back on my time with you all, and I’ve got nothing but positive experiences staring back at me. Intersections gave me a chance when no one else would, and Intersections stood by me through one of the darkest times of my life. Couple that with the opportunities and accomplishments I enjoyed while working there, all I can say is “thank you.” My only regret was that Intersections could not find a place for me.

Each version of this letter was different, personalized for each executive I approached. Within ten minutes I had my first reply. From the C.E.O. Two days later, I had his letter of recommendation.

However, as I stated earlier, every layoff is different. Even after being assured by an executive of another employer that I could turn to him for a positive, worthwhile reference, I considered days later that this was the same executive who had approved my dismissal with no reason in writing, after a solid 90-day review given in the previous month. Could I trust this executive?

Be smart and be savvy in whom you approach for references. In the case of circumstances that can only be described as “sketchy” it’s best to find references elsewhere.

namaste5. Enjoy some downtime for yourself. Yes, you have a workload ahead of you between updating resumes, collecting references, and planning for the job hunt ahead. You also need to make time for you. The night my Intersections layoff happened, I had plans with friends that my wife suggested I cancel. “No,” I told her. “I don’t want to hide. I want to be around friends.” All weekend, I did just that. Friends, neighbors, and, of course, family. Manage this newfound time you find yourself having by banking some quality memories with your family, or broadening your skillset. Your job hunt will be there, waiting for you once you get back from what you’ve set aside for yourself. Prepare yourself for your job hunt. Don’t obsess over it.

There will be some days that are going to be easier than others. By doing some footwork immediately afterward, though, you feel like you’re taking the right steps. If you find yourself in an unexpected, unwanted career change, maybe this blogpost will give you some tips in keeping your career on track.

And when in doubt, head back to Tip #5 and find some time with friends. Laughter makes everything — even getting laid off — a bit more tolerable.