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5 Things to Do after You Lose a Job

walking_the_railsAnyone remember when job creation and unemployment were the priorities of the election? Anyone remember the doom and gloom people projected following our last election? Anyone remember this New York Times article from last month reporting that unemployment was at its lowest rate since 2009? How about these numbers from the Department of Labor backing up this article?

Me neither.

What I do remember is the irony that when I was hired in 2009 by Intersections, the Recession was in full swing with the Unemployment Rate clocking in at 9.6%. And at the beginning of 2012, where a variety of news outlets from around the world were all noticing an economic turnaround at the beginning of 2012 and the rate of 8.5%, I got downsized.

I’ve learned a lot since that time, the reality being that if a company or non-profit needs to get out of the red and into the black, layoffs will happen. Each layoff is different. Some employers treat you with respect and regret, and others don’t blink at blind-siding you and getting you out of the door. It’s hard to predict how bad news like this will come, but I can say there are five things to keep in mind when a rug is yanked out from under you.

1. Don’t panic. Flipping out is easy to do when this news hits; and it’s not going to help anyone. If it does anything, it’s going to make you look like a chump. When I was let go by Intersections, I took a deep breath, and thought, “Go out with class.” When all the formalities were done, I looked the EVP in the eye and said, “It’s been a good run. Thank you.”

Keep it together. Keep it classy.

2. DO. NOT. MELTDOWN. THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA. This was particularly tempting when, with another employer, I was let go under suspicious circumstances. Knowing what I knew about budgets, clerical errors, and executives denied what they really wanted, I knew this whole affair was unethical. When I got home, I felt an urge to go off completely, drop names, and face the fallout; but with my fingers over the keyboard, I paused.

I thought about it. Really thought about it.

What would have sharing my anger and ire accomplished? Social Media still has yet to shake its bad reputation for being all about the meltdowns, as if Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ are nothing more than the therapist’s couch online. Remember that when you go public on social networks, you are going public. How do you want to be remembered at your job and represented online?

Instead of the meltdown, I enjoyed a scotch and cigar on my patio, lit a fire in the firepit, and proceeded to Step 3.

3. Get organized. Whether it is the day of your release or the morning after, your priority should be to check, update, and review your LinkedIn page. Upgrading to a “Premium” account in order to get a few extra bells and whistles is a nice option, but not one I would deem a necessity. Another part of getting organized is to look over your accounts. Look up how much your spending, where you can make your dollar stretch, and what you will need to meet your financial obligations. Set up and maintain spreadsheets not only of your bills and money coming in and going out of your household, but also for the jobs you are applying. Track where you have sent your resume, what you’ve applied for, when, and from where you found the job opening. On your job tracking spreadsheet, you will also want to keep track of any responses so you have an idea of how well your resume is performing.

4. Keep it classy (and smart) when reaching out for references. At the time of downsizing, you have a window of opportunity — preferably within the first week of the layoff — in securing some terrific references. I reached out to the Intersections’ executives I dealt with directly and sent the following note:

I wanted to thank you for two-and-a-half terrific years with your company, Intersections. I’m looking back on my time with you all, and I’ve got nothing but positive experiences staring back at me. Intersections gave me a chance when no one else would, and Intersections stood by me through one of the darkest times of my life. Couple that with the opportunities and accomplishments I enjoyed while working there, all I can say is “thank you.” My only regret was that Intersections could not find a place for me.

Each version of this letter was different, personalized for each executive I approached. Within ten minutes I had my first reply. From the C.E.O. Two days later, I had his letter of recommendation.

However, as I stated earlier, every layoff is different. Even after being assured by an executive of another employer that I could turn to him for a positive, worthwhile reference, I considered days later that this was the same executive who had approved my dismissal with no reason in writing, after a solid 90-day review given in the previous month. Could I trust this executive?

Be smart and be savvy in whom you approach for references. In the case of circumstances that can only be described as “sketchy” it’s best to find references elsewhere.

namaste5. Enjoy some downtime for yourself. Yes, you have a workload ahead of you between updating resumes, collecting references, and planning for the job hunt ahead. You also need to make time for you. The night my Intersections layoff happened, I had plans with friends that my wife suggested I cancel. “No,” I told her. “I don’t want to hide. I want to be around friends.” All weekend, I did just that. Friends, neighbors, and, of course, family. Manage this newfound time you find yourself having by banking some quality memories with your family, or broadening your skillset. Your job hunt will be there, waiting for you once you get back from what you’ve set aside for yourself. Prepare yourself for your job hunt. Don’t obsess over it.

There will be some days that are going to be easier than others. By doing some footwork immediately afterward, though, you feel like you’re taking the right steps. If you find yourself in an unexpected, unwanted career change, maybe this blogpost will give you some tips in keeping your career on track.

And when in doubt, head back to Tip #5 and find some time with friends. Laughter makes everything — even getting laid off — a bit more tolerable.

 

Socially Sharing and Staying Safe while Traveling

girl_on_beachHere in Virginia, we’re getting a reminder that Summer is about to begin. (Enjoy those two days of Spring? Seriously, it was in the 30’s last week, and today it was in the 80’s!) Right now, our thoughts are planning for vacations. They could be getaways to places for off or day trips on spontaneous whims. No matter where you might be headed—domestic or international—the excitement of new adventures and new experiences might leave you open and vulnerable to identity theft and data breach. So in the days before hitting the road or checking in with your airline, you might want to stop and consider how secure you are.

Before setting off, make sure to follow these few tips:

  1. Reconsider geotagging features on smartphone apps and other devices while traveling. Geotagging and Facebook check-in’s are a great way to share your travels, but remember each check-in gives thieves information they need to target your empty home. Photos are fun to post as well, but always remember each tweet, each status update, and each check-in shares GPS coordinates of where you are and where you are not.
  2. Secure your computer. Protect yourself by making sure your anti-virus software is up-to-date. This will allow you to use hotel hotspots safely.
  3. Exercise caution when logging into public networks. Avoid free hotspots as they can be insecure and susceptible to viruses and malware. Consider turning your own smartphone into a hotspot, complete with its own password. (The more passwords, and the more varied they are, the better.)
  4. Be aware of potential phone scams. A popular method for thieves to practice on tourists is to call unsuspecting tourists and claim they are Reception, needing confirmation on a credit card number after a “problem” has occurred. If you receive such a call asking that you confirm a credit card number, tell them you’ll be happy to provide the information at the front desk in person.
  5. Limit the number of credit cards you bring with you. Carry just one with you when sightseeing, but consider keeping a backup in the hotel safe. (Just remember to collect it when leaving!)
  6. Back up your documents. Before leaving, scan your identification, credit cards and essential documents. Save the images in a secure folder or file, either on a cloud service, smartphone, or tablet. Be sure to be able to access them just in case your wallet is stolen.
  7. Carry emergency contact numbers. Keep a copy of emergency contact numbers for your credit cards and bank accounts handy in case you find your wallet lost or stolen. If traveling internationally, keep the address and phone number of your country’s embassy accessible.

It’s okay to relax when you are on vacation, but it never hurts to remain aware of your online security and how your identity and all that is associated with it still matters. Consider these tips outlined above as an investment for you to be able to enjoy yourself and time with your family and friends while away.

Safe travels to you.

Sound Advice for Social Media

From Lisa-Anne Samuels Moore and the sisters of Alpha Gamma Delta: Rho Chapter…

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I’m Tee Morris…and boy-howdy do I approve of this message!